Saturday, August 16, 2014

A Week in Farm Photos - August 10th - 16th



This week was bittersweet. We lost one of our Saxony ducks to advanced liver failure which was quite a shock. Then our Lavender Orpington rooster, Emilio, really tore up Truffle, our Chocolate Orpington so he's now going to be finding a new home (email me if you're in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area and interested!) and she's being cared for in the hospital ward. We don't tolerate bullying or drama in our chicken yard any more than I do online. 

But the week ended on an upnote as I finished up a 6-part series I am writing for HGTVGardens and got my outline worked out for Book #2. I also finalized a deal with an exciting new sponsor. I'll be helping them develop a brand new product line for spring which I'm really eager to get started on! Enjoy this week's photos.




















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6 comments:

  1. I'm very sorry about Taffy. It's so hard to lose an animal friend. Hope next week is more joyful.

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    1. Thank you. It is hard. Especially when it's so sudden like that.

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  2. So sorry about the loss and injury of your animals. Never easy. Congratulations on the rest of your news and your photos are stunning!

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    1. Thank you. Worst part of farm life is an injured (or worse) animal. We just love them all so much.

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  3. I have a question that maybe someone can help me with. We had 18 chickens that we let free roam all day. We now have lost 6 of them to I don't know what. We do live out in the country so it could be any of several animals. A hawk, owl, fox, coyote or ??? We have found no sign of anything to give us a clue, no feathers or anything. they mostly stay in our open areas and just kind of graze the edges of the woods. So what can we do to keep them safe other than keeping them in their yard all the time?

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    1. So sorry for the poor hens. Free ranging never really ends well. Whatever it was will jus keep coming back. I assume you lock them up in a secure coop at night? I would recommend a large enclosed run. Otherwise, you're just raising chickens to feed the local wildlife unfortunately. Without a trained livestock guard dog, you're pretty much dooming your remaining chickens to death.

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