Sunday, July 27, 2014

Classic Crème Brulee


One of the many wonderful benefits of fresh eggs is that they elevate any recipe from merely delicious to truly divine. That holds true especially with this classic Créme Brûleé recipe. Using only four ingredients, this is my go-to dessert for special occasions. Easy to make, it lets the freshness and taste of your fresh eggs shine. The combination of the sweet brittle sugar coating atop a silky smooth custard underneath is irresistible. Since today is Natural Créme Brûleé  Day, I thought it appropriate to share my recipe.

Classic Créme Brûleé 
(makes 6)

3 Cups heavy cream
1/2 Cup granulated sugar
8 egg yolks, whisked
1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste or 3 vanilla beans scraped

6 round or oval single-serving oven-proof ramekins (4-6 oz. size)
6 Tablespoons granulated sugar or mixture of white and brown sugar (for topping)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Place ramekins in a baking pan and set aside. Set a teakettle of water on the stove to boil. 

Combine cream and 1/2 cup of granulated sugar in a saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and gradually whisk in the egg yolks and vanilla. Strain and divide the strained liquid into the ramekins. Set in the oven and  carefully pour enough boiling water into the baking pan to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins. 

Bake for 40-50 minutes until just set (centers will move slightly when gently shaken). Let cool, then carefully remove ramekins from the water bath, cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least three hours (or up to two days). 

When ready to serve, sprinkle top of each custard with 1 Tablespoon sugar, then broil or brown with a handheld kitchen torch until sugar melts and bubbles. Let cool just until topping hardens and serve immediately.


Bon Appetit....Happy Créme Brûleé  Day! 

photo credit: www.mccormickandschmicks.com

DID YOU KNOW---> The first creme brulee recipe was published in Frenchman François Massialot's cookbook,“Cuisinier Roial et Bourgeois” (Royal and Borgeoise Cooking) in 1691 and literally means 'burnt cream'.


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4 comments:

  1. This looks so good! I am a huge fan of brulee. Visiting from GirlGab!

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    1. Hello! Welcome. It's clearly an indulgence, but it's all fresh, wholesome ingredients so well worth it!

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  2. Do you see any difference when you use duck vs. chicken yolks?

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    1. Yes I do. I always sub duck eggs in one for one for chicken eggs in recipes, although I guess the exact ratio is 3 chicken eggs = 2 duck eggs.... But lately we've been eating mostly all duck eggs and for baking I always use the duck eggs. If you make this recipe using duck egg yolks your custard will be super creamy and delicious! Just one more reason to love our ducks :0)

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