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Sunday, September 9, 2012

Free-Range Chicken Gardens Book Review & Giveaway

Recently, I was asked by Timber Press to become a regular book reviewer for their publishing house. They focus primarily on books relating to gardening, horticulture, sustainability, DIY crafts and garden design, among other topics.

Being an avid hobby gardener, creative crafter and wanna-be builder, as well as a backyard chicken keeper, I was thrilled to say yes.



Although the book "Free-Range Chicken Gardens - How to Create a Beautiful Chicken-Friendly Yard" by Jessi Bloom was published earlier this year, I asked if it could be the first book sent me to review since the chicken/gardening connection is obviously a subject near and dear to my heart.  Timber Press agreed - and I am excited to be able to offer a copy of this wonderful book to one lucky reader to win. 

I own a copy of this book already. I bought it shortly after it was published back in January, because I was interested in landscaping my chicken run this past spring.  The book, though written mainly for those who free-range their flocks, was an invaluable resource for me when I was deciding which shrubs and plants to introduce to our run.  And now, several months later, I am proud to report we have a beautifully landscaped run that has somehow managed to survive despite our flock of 30 hens and ducks.  Read more about what I ended up planting HERE.




Written by award-winning garden designer, Jessi Bloom, and beautifully photographed by Kate Baldwin, this 224 page softcover book includes more than 120 color photographs of gardens, coops and chickens.  It includes handy lists of suggested shrubs, trees, vines, ground cover and other 'chicken friendly' plants, as well as lists of toxic and poisonous plants to avoid.




There are sketches of garden plans, which incorporate a coop and compost area, as well as guidelines for space requirements, and different types of coops to consider.  There is an entire chapter on predators and pests, including tips on organic pest control.  There is a section on other garden fowl such as ducks, as well as other types of livestock.  The book also touches on chicken health and includes some information on various breeds to consider.  The back includes an alphabetical index, comprehensive list of resources and a cold-hardiness table by zone.

~rosebushes in our run~
In short, if you have any interest in creating a beautiful setting for your chickens to roam, whether inside a run or out, this is the book for you. The gorgeous photographs are enough inspiration alone to turn your backyard and run into an oasis, and the handy 'suggestion' lists are great to bring to your local garden center for landscape and garden ideas.








For more information or to purchase the book direct from the publisher, click HERE.

Please telling me a bit about your success (or lack thereof) with chickens and landscaping and/or gardening.  I would love to hear!





Congratulations to Chris M. who has won a copy of the book!

Disclosure: Timber Press sent me a complimentary copy of this book to review, however I was not compensated in any way for my comments, which are entirely my own, nor was my review prejudiced in any way by their gift.

196 comments:

  1. I have had variable success and a fair share of mishaps too. If the plants were established I had no problem with the girls messing it up but if the get into the veggie garden it can become a real big mess. I would like to read this book to see if maybe there is a way to do both.

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  2. My parents have had chickens in their backyard my whole life. We are not allowed to where we (my husband and I) live now, but we are about to move into a city/neighborhood where we can have them, and they are the FIRST thing I am getting. So I could really use this book to get my coop/run started the right way!

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  3. this would be a super book to have. it's my first year with chickens and i love em. would love to have a garden for them to use...
    thanks for the opportunity...

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  4. Since my first chickens aren't here yet I can't say currently but I remember as a child we had a couple that loved to dig up everything but most were happy to just pick at everything but they had almost 2 acres to roam

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  5. Looks like a grwat read for us at the Miller Family Poultry Farm in Indiana. Thisrecent garden season we had a wonderful harvest. Pre plant we added droppings our coop. That with our active weeding and watering made for some greats for us and our flock. MillerFamilyPoultry@gmail.com

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  6. I am actually starting my journey towards chickendom. It all started last year, when I saw geese in a pen on a farm. The pair needed love and attention. I fell in love with them. One year later, I am watering the same farmer's horses, turkeys, the two geese, and ordered my own gaggle. Just last month while I was online in the middle of the night, I ordered 25 chickens via McMurray. Later, a co-worker asked me if I thought about cancelling it, because I have my hands full with geese at the present moment. The order was cancelled in order to prepare for them for the spring. (to be fair and kind to them) I pay "rent" through caring for the farmer's animals, and I get to decorate his farm with mine. :O)

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  7. I am trying to convince my husband that we need chickens but have had no luck yet, still waiting, maybe this would convince him.

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  8. btw: valeriejbruce@gmail.com (*not-so annonymous above----lol. In fact, if my dream company takes off (not sure what it is but I have the name) It would be called Goose Annon, because I am addicted to poultry. (I wasn't sure how to post my email....not sure if it would post publicly....oh well, hi there public.) :o)

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  9. I am getting chickens next spring so I am going to need this book to help me figure out a few things.

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  10. Just got into the Pet Chickens. We have Plymouth Barred Rock, Columbian Barred Rock, Buff Orpington, Lavendar Orpington, Lace winged Wyandotte, Black Austrolorp. Love seeing them run all over the yard....but could really use the help this book has for new ideas. I can be reached at ayercutinc@aol.com

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  11. My two favorite things: chickens and gardens. The chickens help me keep the beds tilled up and the insects under control.

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  12. I'm ready to plant a spring garden for the girls. This book would be a perfect primer.

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  13. Would love to win this, we are poultry lovers!

    Thanks,
    Heidi

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  14. It's been a dream of mine to have a few chickens, making plans for next year! This book looks like just what I need!

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  15. My husband and I hopefully will close on a darling 5-acre farm in a couple of weeks. I would be thrilled to win so I could learn more about chickens and gardens:)

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  16. I love your facebook page! It was the 1st backyard chicken page I liked & have been so happy about all the information you share. Since I've been unemployed as of last May & became a foodie just before then, I have started doing many things from scratch; gardening, landscaping, canning, chickens, homemade home products, cheap redecorating, crafting. I am always looking for great ideas & hope that by next year, I will have a new business that is beginning to take off for me! Besides...I lOvE to read and am always looking for new books : D
    Julie L. @ angelflyerjdl@yahoo.com

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  17. I started with my chickens in January. Had never owned any before that time. Now have over 29 breeds and love every second of it. Came home from our County Fair yesterday with 8 first place wins, 2 second place wins, a fourth place, and a fifth place win. Would love to have this book so I could learn even more about my birds. We are just fixing to plant them a fall garden and how wonderful this book would be to have.

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  18. I would love some ideas on how to beautify my coop area.

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  19. I've only been a chicken momma since early this summer.....I am so hooked. I have found your blogs and facebook page to be an invaluable source of information to me!! Your ideas/tips/information and photos inspire and excite me, and I am loving every minute of it! If I had only known just how much joy chickens would have brought to me, I would have had them in my life years ago! I would love this book!

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  20. The one discouraging thought I've had about getting chickens is what they would do to my garden - or at least whatever part they would have access to. This book looks like it just might be the solution to that problem.

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  21. I could use this book, I cover all my flower plants with wire to keep the chickens out, works, but would love to know what to plant that they would leave alone. Our chickens all free range, so they have the run of the yard and pastures, but would have it no other way, they have the best tasting eggs around!
    Betsy
    lazyaranch@centurytel.net

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  22. We have 10 acres in Rosamond, CA. We have Peafowl, a male, female and 2 chicks born this year. I am currently researching chicken keeping, and am finding many suggestions on your blog fit my Peafowl, such as the meal worm (which I already got and started my 3 drawer keeping). I am excited to get some Chickens and want to make sure I research and set up things before I actually get the chickens. I absolutely love all the colored eggs you have! Amazing! I love the vinegar cleaning recipe with the orange peel, and am going to get the stuff tomorrow. Keep up the great suggestions, I love your FB and Blog.

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  23. I think I really need this book lol I have free range chickens and ducks and guineas. Ducks have trashed my lawn and flowers. Chickens now use my flower bed as a dust bathing place. My poor gnomes I put in my flower bed get a dust bath also.lol This has all happened this year as I have bought all of them in the spring to complement my new house. I also learned the hard way that poke berries make ducks drunk. It would be awesome to learn more about what would survive my brood. :)

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  24. Love, love, LOVE chickens, they are my feathered friends. At present I do not have the pleasure of having these intelligent and kind hearted critters in my life - but intend on it not being long before I can have chickens chasing bugs and scratching at the ground again.

    When I did have chickens a few years back they were greatly loved and allowed out of their coop for late afternoon run of the yard exercise. They would run through the garden picking bugs off of plants (sometimes getting a bloom in the process), and they had a field day when I was turning new ground for there was bound to be a grub or ten or twenty for them to 'share'.

    Would love to be as prepared as I can for the arrival of chickens back into my life.

    sheilovealways@yahoo.com
    USA

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  25. This is perfect! I have been wanting to start a chicken garden for a while now. This book would be a perfect primer for doing it!

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  26. I haven't planted anything as I just figured they would eat everything! It would be nice to learn what, why and where I could plant. After this hot, hot summer I am especially interested in adding shade. Thank you for your great information.

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  27. This would be great to have! We live in a neighborhood with close neighbors, so it would be great to have nice food for the girls and have the run look pretty too.
    Missy- hesterfam@knology.net

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  28. I would love to get a chance to win you Free-Range Chicken Gardens book. We do free range our chickens currently. We leave some of our garden like strawberries out of the fenced off garden for the chickens. It would be nice to know other things to plant outside "our garden" for the chickens.

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  29. Can't wait to read this book. Just completed a large raised bed backyard garden and have been wondering how to incorporate feathered friends without losing all the hard work and benefits. Sounds like the book to give me the answers.

    sherryc@eoni.com

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  30. Wow between the new book that the Chicken Whisperer put out and your book I will be rich with information and the care of chickens in the garden, etc. My husband built me a darling coop that i think is cuter than our own house!! Now just need to landscape the run and they will be the luckiest chickens in town:) Thankyou for the the opportunity to enter this giveaway. My email is llsickles@gmail.com

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  31. I love having backyard chickens,they roam my yard all day long, but they are tearing up my yard! I would love to know how to create a beautiful chicken landscape! thank you for the opportunity to win a book!

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  32. I just planted my fall garden and have to install electric wire fence to keep deer out. I let the chickens out to free range about 3 hours each evening and after shoooing them out several times, they get the message. Would love to have this book.

    ronboandmamajo@gmail.com

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  33. Such a valuable resource. I do TRY to make my chicken area, and entire back yard, more inviting... if I only had a clue.

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  34. Ugh, we have no landscaping! We have a concrete backyard. So we have turned two planter boxes into their yard. I sure would love to glean from some of these ideas, though!

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  35. We raised chickens for years, while our youngest son Kalob showed them every year for 4-H. After he was grown and we moved into a new home, our empty nest was even empty-er...we missed our chickens! So we (my husband & I) have our babies back...we now have 8 chickens and LOVE it!

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  36. I have had great luck with chickens an landscaping. We give lots of treats!

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  37. This is a wonderful way to prepare to have chickens.

    ekfeatherston@gmail.com

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  38. Section off an area for the chickens to play and don't let them wonder. My chickens eat every plant they can get a hold of, save sticker vines/dew berries. That is my experience. My chickens were goats in a past life!

    Draw out a plan first, then get your chicks.

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  39. As the drought played havoc with my garden again this summer, I've reluctantly turned it over to the hens to finish off. But if my optimism returns next spring, I will need a better plan for the hens and garden to co-exist happily. Bet this book is just the ticket!

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  40. My sweet potato plants didn't stand a chance once our flock found them. I probably wasted my time putting out seed for my fall garden too. Maded it until a last month with my pallet vegie garden but now they know were it is and I can't keep them out. sharon@dalton.net

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  41. Love my chickens & my garden! They free range & my garden is open to them. Yes - I lose a few tomatoes & cues, but I don't use pesticides. The chickens eat all the bugs & fertilize the plants - for the price of a few veggies. We just plant extra! Just finishing a new coop & enlarging our garden. I would LOVE to read this book!
    Chrisandjenhuffman@gmail.com
    Thanks!
    Jen

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  42. Our chicken coop is under construction and this is just the book I need to read! I love, love gardening and am ready to begin planning a bountiful and beautiful "chicken garden" that will be just as nutritious as it is delicious for our first hens! The greatest joy in this project will be teaching my 2 year old grandson all about caring for the earth and raising animals with plenty of TLC. I can't wait!
    Chris
    mcd777@hotmail.com

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    Replies
    1. Congratulations Chris! You have been chosen as the winner! Please send your mailing address so I can get your book out to you! Lisa

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  43. I've had this book on my wish list for some time now. My chickens have completely destroyed NY garden. I always thought day Lillie's were indestructible and they did well for me and my lack of a green thumb...until I got chickens

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  44. I have to keep my vegetable garden fenced in until I'm done with it for the season! Then in the fall I take the fence down and the fertilize and clean everything up :)

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  45. We have a growing flock of poultry and one area that seems to lack obvious symbiosis is the garden. I understand imparted nitrogen from my feathered companions, but they love my strawberries more than I do. Perhaps this book could shed light on ways to tear the walls of partition between the birds and the vegetables.

    Jason Mullins

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  46. I would love this book. I have the best pet chickens in the world and they all love to free range!!! Connie

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  47. I see all your beautiful plants surrounding your coop and also the beautiful coop landscaping in this book and I am really inspired! I want to make ky coop beautiful too. I need landscaping around my coop to block off the west sun from their run and to block off some of that hot south wind. I have planted things but they've often gotten trampled before they can get enough size on them to survive. I love my chickens! I've had my coop for about 5 years but it needs sprucing up!

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  48. We are going to be free ranging our chickens. A book like this would be invaluable for us. Books cost so much now, so a chance to win one would be great.
    I've been researching what to add to our yard and pasture for free range chickens; please put my name in your drawing. Thank you, Lisa.
    Have a wonderful week and congratulations on being a reviewer!

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  49. I'm ready to take on the challenge and need advice. I'd love to have this book!

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  50. I'm ready to take on the challenge and need advice. I'd love to have this book!

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  51. Chickens are one of the smartest investments a family can make! Love fresh eggs!!

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  52. I first met Jessi Bloom in about 2003, in a non-profit group composed ofthe organic landscapers in the greater Seattle area. Jessi has been an inspiration to me (tinged with some envy) as her success in making landscapes flourish and promoting the professional growth of her employees and peers has also made her business succeed. Regarding my chickens, I bought ten female chicks, feeders and a heat lamp in about 2005. They grew up and every day I would let them out of their raccoon proof house and let them run free until sunset. One of them started crowing in the morning. I'm not a morning person. And by then I didn't want to start butchering them. I gave them away instead. I would do it again, but my house and land got foreclosed. So I'll probably never have a yard again. But I would still like a copy of Jessi's book!

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  53. Our girls will be free range when they're older and I want a back yard much like an English garden. I'm not sure how it will end up working!
    mairn1@yahoo.co

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  54. I get to have chickens this next spring! I am sooo happy! I have the coop & the run so far, & there are some things I still need but it's going to be fun collecting them. I think I like the Austrolorps best.

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  55. That book looks great! I would to make our chicken area more lush! Mdecaris@yahoo.com

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  56. We live in Las Vegas, so having chickens isn't very common. But as soon as we got enough land to have some, we got 'em and love 'em! Right now we have 12 but I think we're getting two more from a friend very soon. Our backyard is desert landscaping but our next big project is to landscape it and put in a garden. I love getting back to nature. We would love to win the book! chriseagar@hotmail.com

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  57. We are new to the chicken family. My husband built their coop and we purchased 6 day old chicks. We love our girls - 3 buff orpingtons and 3 barred rocks. They just turned 4 months old. Can't wait to gather our first egg. I'm sure the book would help us.

    Love your blog - it has helped us a lot.

    Sheila
    sshook7888@aol.com

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  58. Looking forward to purchasing our first chicks in the spring. Would love tips from this book to make everyone happy.

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  59. I have four hens and they roam my back yard which is small a few hours a day. They have been pretty destructive so far. I need to change some plants to those they don't like as much.

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  60. This book would be PERFECT for us! we've just gotten our first set of chicks to go with a couple older rescue hens and now we're planning a big chicken "run/garden" for them.

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  61. I don't have chickens yet, but I'm getting my yard ready for a few hens, so this book would be great to have! Thanks for sharing the review.

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  62. This is my second flock. We have had them 1 year this past spring. I lost the first flock to hawks. So this flock I placed underneath the shade of a really old and large oak tree we call Ludy Will. Inside our 30x50 chicken yard, which is 60% under Ludy, is all bare. I have full sun, shade, and partial shade areas. I simply do not know what to do for the girls. We had a rooster. A really bad rooster. He was so mean to my girls he had to go. The girls seem content without him and all the feathers on their back are coming in nicely. My chickens are so pretty. I wish their yard was too. We, my 3 daughters and I, enjoy hanging out with the girls, but would enjoy it much more if it was inside a lovely country garden!

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  63. Thanks for hosting this giveaway. I do not have any chicken experience yet because we live in a tiny apartment. We're house hunting though and one thing I'm looking for is somewhere I can have chickens. I'd love to have this book to help me figure out how to prepare the new yard for the future chickens.

    themamapirate@gmail.com

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  64. My husband and can't wait to retire to move out into the country where we have a home a wants to raise some chickens! We were looking today at Home Depot sheds to use as a ready made walk in chicken coop. Of course we would have to make a few modifications but just dreaming about it makes us so excited!

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  65. My husband and can't wait to retire to move out into the country where we have a home a wants to raise some chickens! We were looking today at Home Depot sheds to use as a ready made walk in chicken coop. Of course we would have to make a few modifications but just dreaming about it makes us so excited!

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  66. The chickens were in the fenced backyard at our apartment for a year before we moved them out to our new property. For the longest time last summer, they never touched our tomato plants but we didn't get more than 5 green beans as they attacked every new flower they saw. They never touched the onions either thankfully. Now that they are out in their new coop at their new home, they just recently discovered the garden on the other side of the house. They love to wander through the corn and pluck bugs off but they have once again discovered the green beans and now we must watch them even more diligently as they love those little bushes!

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  67. I had no idea there was such a book. I really need some help on which plants to get and how to arrange the plantings. I also have bees and need flowering plants for them, as well. I've just had a bed dug for the outside of the Chicken run so I could really some help.

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  68. Great contest! I have been following you on facebook and have my first set of hens. We love having fresh eggs for our little family and living more locally. Thanks for all your tips and advice. Keep up the good work!

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  69. We are new to chickens so haven't had them long enough to have any mishaps luckily. We do let them into the garden and if it weren't a loss to begin with from the drought, it would have been a problem. I would love to have this book! It would be so helpful I'm sure since I am learning as I go!

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  70. We just started raising chickens this year with 25 chicks we bought in March and they just started laying eggs! Unfortunately, we are not able to free range our chickens due to neighbors' loose dogs and coyotes. We do have a large run and are expanding it again. This book would be great because we were just talking about "landscaping" our run, and were unsure what plants, etc to use that would be safe for them.

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  71. Wow, I love the pictures of how you transformed your run! Although most of my girls free range, the run itself still gets pretty beat up and barren. I've been slowly finding plants that can withstand chicken traffic and the plants help with insect control and water run off too. I have two hibiscus bushes that managed to survive WI winters but are in danger of being stomped to death by the chicken ladies, I'm going to try building a paver "collar" like you've done. So far the best accidental planting has been mint by the preferred spot for dust bathing- natural poultry perfume! alittlebatty at gmail dot com

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  72. We have so much clay its hard to grow anything but we do have a couple of raised bed veg. and herb gardens. One of our Modern chickens loves to make her nest under the Oregano plants but the squirrels eat all my veggies, they love the potatoes >:(
    Brenda b_davalos@sbclobal.net

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  73. I have 2 ISA Browns who are lovely ladies, but they have eaten up my whole garden aside from the trees, help. Now they are working on my neighbour's garden which is a bit of a jungle, but I'm sure it won't be long until they complain about things being dug up too. I would love to have some ideas on how to have the chickens and plants live together harmoniously.

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  74. I will be moving within two months to an ecovillage and I am looking forward to starting a small herb farm. I have never raised chickens before and want to have a small flock around the herbs for weed and insect control, and of course for the eggs! I've heard only great things about this book - I'm quite certain I will be needing it. Thanks for making this giveaway available!

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  75. Seeing your review was timely for me, we are just now prepping a rotating garden run for the chickens. Looks like this will be a good one to add to the chickens section of our farm "library".

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  76. I would love to win this book. We got our first chickens in March and are having so much fun with them!

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  77. I would love to win this book!
    We built a fenced in garden last year, but because it was a new house, we underestimated how much sun that section of the yard would get.
    Now, we're going to build a new garden in another part of the yard & we've realized the old garden would be perfect for a chicken coup as it has a lot of room. I think this book would help us learn what we need before we go chicken. :)

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  78. We're so new to chickens, we don't even have them yet. Our chicks are being raised by a friend but we get them in 8 more weeks. Our coop has just been moved to the backyard but it looks barren. We were hoping to let the chickens roam through our veggie garden at the end of the season but just found out tomato and potato plants can be toxic to chickens. We desperately need the book to help us sort out what will be best for our chickens!
    Maureen ~ momcmullen@aol.com

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  79. We decided to get six hens this year. They get to roam the backyard but I tried planting some grass in their run. It only lasted two days before all the grass dissapeared.

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  80. I am going to have to get this! We're building a new coop and run as we are increasing our flock. All of our runs in the past have eventually turned into barren wastelands that I'm constantly throwing goodies in for them to eat and play in. I have "big" plans for the new "house and yard" as I want it to be presentable for customers as well.
    Jamie Fletcher-Phillips-Phillips Egg Company

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  81. My flock.of twenty has eaten everything I have planted in the coop. Help! Would love this book.
    Kristy R.
    Baystar59@yahoo.com

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  82. I have great memories of collecting eggs with my beloved Grandma. I have horrible memories of my beautiful chickens being attacked by critters at night time when I tried to set up a coop as an adult! I am moving next year and plan to have chickens again so that my granddaughter will have fresh, natural eggs to eat and have great memories of going to collect eggs with her grandma!

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  83. I am finding that a squirrel is eating my sunflowers at night and in the morning the chickens run to the garden and eat the leftovers off the ground!!

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  84. Thanks for such an invaluable site. We are in the process of transforming our new home and 1/2 acre lot into different garden "rooms" (moon garden, water garden, vegetables, fruit trees and flowers, etc.) Integrating the coop and chicken yard into the entire plan while growing much of their fresh food is the challenge, and it sounds like this book is exactly what we need! Our 8 happy year old hens bless us with 5 or 6 colorful eggs a day...Happy hens, happy home! Kathleen kmcleod1950@hotmail.com

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  85. Our chickens free range in our garden. It seems that our garden grew this year just for them - we never got to the veggies first. Oh well, the chickens ate well. That means healthy eggs for us. on the up side - we are no longer infested with snails. The chickens ate them too! So all around I think we will keep doing things the way we are and buy our veggies from the farmer down the road:)

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  86. I've wanted this book since I saw it was coming out! So excited for this give-away.

    We just got chickens this year, ordered them (day-old) online from a reputable hatchery. They all survived and are laying very well! We have pretty much kept them to the coop and run and I wish we could let them roam about a bit more. My fear is that the neighboring dogs will get to them if I let them out and that they would tear up my vegetable and herb gardens. My gardens are my source of veggies during the growing months so I don't feel that I can take that chance in letting them out, even supervised. They are well spoiled birds though, getting lots of kitchen scraps and fresh veggies from the gardens and it shows from the quality of our eggs.

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  87. My hens love to dig up my bulbs, probably because of the loose soil. I'd love to plant a garden just for them!

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  88. Enjoy the blog! I'd love to have a cc of this book as I've been contemplating getting one all spring. New to chickens this year and working on planting various things that they can eat. My experience so far has been that everything gets destroyed so I'm looking for some things that are a little more sustainable from season to season.

    Thanks for the review and for the chance to win!

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  89. This would be a great book, we are moving in a few months. Going from 10 acres to just under 2! I will definitely have to plan out my coops and gardens next season. This book would be a great resource!

    clayne317@gmail.com

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  90. Yeah, I wasnKt expecting getting chickens when I planned my vegetable garden. It is pretty much dessimated. I'm thinking of relocating the vegetables to the front yard and planting chicken crops in the back.

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  91. I've never let the chickens out into the garden, too afraid. Maybe the ideas in this book give me the courage I need! jalley22@hotmail.com

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  92. My dream is to have a cute, larger fenced in area for the girls to roam & be safe (hawks and random dogs). I bought this book when it came out, then bought a copy for a friend & would love another copy to give to another chicken friend. Awesome book, makes me drool over the cute chicken gardens.

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  93. I would like to landscape the outside of our chicken coop, not only to dress it up, but to also provide the chickens with some additional nutrional options that can only come from free ranging. Chickens are happiest when running free!

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  94. Oh, I would LOVE this book! If I don't win it, I am definitely going to order it! :-)
    LaVonne

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  95. Oh, so I didn't post any success or disasters.....I am tired of buying annual bedding plants only to have my chickens dig them up and eat them! :-)

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  96. My girls get about 1/2 our yard to roam, this includes trees and grass and one well established bush. At first they were given the entire yard and all but decimated all my garden and potted plants. Would love to make their half of the yard look pretty again! :)

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  97. This summer we had to have our one and only shade tree in the chicken run cut down. Very, very sad day that was. I am now left with zero natural shade and the run looks horrible to me. I honestly cried over the loss of this huge old tree and did not look forward to taking care of my chickens because it looked so ugly with the tree gone.
    So I am now looking for ways to add natural shade and landscaping ideas. Your page itself has helped me with some ideas and I am hopeful that I CAN make my chicken run beautiful again!

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  98. I have had great luck growing DIRT!! I would love to have information that has worked.

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  99. I'd love to read the tips/pointers given out in here, thanks for the opportunity

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  100. i would love to have this book to help me get started!

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  101. Our chickens have a large run with a couple of rose bushes and an apricot tree for shade. They have eaten everything as high up as they can jump it. :) Knowing what kinds of shrubs we could plant in there would be nice.
    dnsgibson@juno.com

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  102. Just starting the chicken process so this book would be very helpful.

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  103. I bough my house in March & got my chickens at the end of May. I did start a vegetable garden & the chickens love to pick off my cherry tomatoes & eat the bugs around the plant. Other than that though my yard is a blank canvas. The soil is red clay & filled with rocks, but a good friend gave me a garden tiller & I am not afraid of hard work. I would love to have the guidance of this book!

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  104. I began a new garden in a new home this last year and wanted to add chickens, but, thought I might be biting off more than I could chew. Would love to have this book!

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  105. I'd love this book for my daughter who is currently working on her coop. Pick me!!

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  106. We are a few months away from getting chickens. Of all of the things we are going to pursue, I have to say I am most excited about the chickens! I need all of the help I can get :)

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  107. I have 4 chickens in a large run in my suburban backyard. I have planted a dogwood bush inside the run. They ate most of the leaves at the bottom, but loved to hang out under the bush for dust baths and shade. I also have grape vines climbing the outside fence for shade (and fruit)and they love to jump and eat what leaves they can reach. HOWEVER, we have since added a flemish giant bunny to the mix and he ate the dogwood bush. He even pulled the branches down so he could eat all the leaves up top. It now looks pathetic with only 2 or 3 branches with partial leaves. We are caging it off for a season to hopefully let it grow-we wanted it for the shade for the girls. I will also be planting some butterfly bushes in the run-but they will be caged off to start as well.

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  108. I'm trying to talk my husband into getting chickens and I think this book will show him how we can incorporate them into our lives/backyard.

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  109. My chickens and I would love a copy of this book! I have been letting them in my sons garden but worry about what plants could be harmful to them.
    Robin Fallot
    robinfallot@rocketmail.com

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  110. I do not have chickens, but I want some. This book would be a great way to get started. Patriciawhitten@ymail.com

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  111. My chicken and duck run surrounds my garden. This is ideal because I get to throw weeds, culled produce, etc. to my birdies. I would like to add some additional landscaping inside their run to provide them with more shade. This book would be very helpful!

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  113. What a wonderful giveaway! I haven't seen this book but would love a copy for sure. We have two runs, one for our older hens and one for our juvenile hens. I LOVE the idea of landscaping the run and beautifying their little homes but don't want to plant anything that would harm them. We painted our coop, well my two daughters did, with all sorts of sayings and pictures so now we need to work on the run! Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy of the book! tara@dellaroseliving.com (had to delete previous comment because I left a letter out of my email addy)

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  114. I haven't had the pleasure of having backyard chickens yet, but I long for the day when I have a mini homestead and chickens in the yard. I have had some success with my gardening in the past, but recently moved and I am now in a new climate and in a rental... so learning again and having fun doing it!

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  115. Hi, I'm new this summer to backyard chicken keeping and gardening. It's amazing what one can learn in a year. I havn't let the Girls free range yet because I don't want the garden shredded just yet. This month i will probably clip some wings and protect the fall/winter plantings and let them at the rest of the beds befor planting cover crops. I could use some help from this book!

    Ann

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  116. I just got chickens again after a several-year "hiatus". I would love to learn how better to mix my chickens and my garden, since my experience was unfortunately, the chickens liked to eat the same veggies I do!

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  117. Although I grew up around chickens when I was very young, I am brand new to keeping chickens! My first flock started with 4 and lost 1 this past week! Part of the learning curve and I will miss her! This is such a great book and I would love to have it and read it again! Thanks for the giveaway.

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  118. I planted some mint this year because I read that it is beneficial in helping the chickens stay cool. That may be but my chickens didn't want anything to do with it. However, they loved to nibble on my tomatoes and cucumbers. I guess they didn't realize that I get first dibbs on those. I would love to have this book and learn more about actually landscaping the run and keeping them out of my veggies.

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  119. My first year raising two RSL hens. I have veggie gardens, flower beds, and a koi pond. I'm always trying to learn new things for my passions. Having the book would definitely be beneficial. I read everything I can get my hands on.

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  120. The chickens are in the backyard where there is lots of shade (and thus not a lot of garden for them to tear up). The compost I make from their coop bedding is great for the gardens in front though. My one problem that I did have was that their scratching dug up my newly discovered patch of chanterelle mushrooms, I need to keep them out of that part of the yard during chanterelle season.

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  121. this sounds like a great book for our little chicken group( persons, not chics lol)I have a bunch of chickens but they are all inclosed with chicken wire, because I dont want coyotes or dogs to get them. If they were in a garden doing double duty, that would be good for them and me
    thanks Shirley slmoon@aol.com

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  122. What goes better together than chickens and beautiful gardens..Best fertilizer any where you can find, and there is just something so lovely about seeing chickens and beautiful plants..I know mine love to rest under the cover of lovely foliage... Would Love to get this book..Thanks ..Sheilah locklear

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  123. Hi,
    I love your blog, I was introduced to it through my cousin. I save inmporant ideas, like the chicken laying mash recipe,in preparation for becoming a chicken mommy. I just got a some flower beds started this year, in which I planted vegatables in amongst the flowers. I would love to have this book, to help me do a proper job of being a chicken momma. I live on 60 acres of wooded property, so the chapter about predators would be invaluable! Darlinda

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  124. This book looks like an amazing way to find it integration between pretty gardening and practical gardening. I free range my chickens during the day and put them for safekeeping in the coop at night. I am working on designing a space in the backyard that would allow them to Rome and play and keep them out of the veggies that I don't want them to eat. Keffielancaster@gmail.com

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  125. I'm writing this as "Anonymous" because I don't have any of the profiles that they have listed. My name is Kimberly. The book you're offering looks like something that would really help us!! We live in a partial woods and want to get chickens. We are trying to figure out the best way to go about free-ranging them while still keeping them safe in such an environment. We are limited on space, as well, since we have dogs, are raising rabbits, want to get goats and horses, and have a huge garden!! lol We are ambitious!!! johnsok@parkwayschools.org

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  126. my chickens ate my start of multiplying onions that i had in a pot temporarily(until I had time to plant them). Of course you know the rest of the story....they did not multiply!! hahaha...love my chickens..but I am down to 4.
    In the last 2 months, (most happened in a week and 1/2 time period) Something got/ate/killed 2 hens and 18 babies and young chickens. My husband is building me a new and better/safer coop in a new location! It broke my heart..a mother and 9 2mo.old chicks ALL went missing in 1 day in broad daylight. They free ranged during the day. The other hen had 8 3day old chicks and 5 went missing in 1 afternoon. So I penned her and the 3 remaining chicks ...next afternoon...1 chick dead...right by the chicken wire inside pen..no head..so i reinforced the pen...the next afternoon..another chick was gone...nothin but feathers...ooh i was upset so I added some tin barriers on 1 side....the next day..the mom ..dead...no head..right outside their little shelter in the middle of the pen. I snatched the final baby up and kept him inside for a month in a box. I fnally put him outside in a different enclosure/pen that I felt was safe....2 wks later..sometime between 3:30 and 7 p.m. something got him...nothing but the head and wings were left! I have no clue what may have gotten them... but my new coop/house/pen is gonna be like fort knox...what i dont understand is the whole period of the killimg spree..I had a dominique hen and a silkie rooster running free...still have them...also had/have 2 polish hens in a big pen that would be so easy for something to get into if it really tried...nothing bothered them either...any ideas?

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  127. I love your Facebook page. I loved having chickens for about 18 months. 2 years ago I gave them away but hope to get more. Thanks for all your wonderful information and pictures!

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  128. I live in town for now so my hens are not free range so I have no experience to relay. However I have been reading up on it , using them in the garden, and I am anxious to try it when we move!

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  129. My success was a couple weeks ago when we hatched our very first chicks. We were soooo excited to see those little fluff balls in the incubator. What is really cool is hearing them peep in the incubator!!
    My chickens are my relief work. I enjoy feeding, watching, hatching and watching my babies grow. I have a bantam sittin right now also and our first there as well.

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  130. I have not been very successful integrating our birds in our yard. I have had to fence off our garden and net our berries. Fortunately this has deterred the hens. They love running around the yard and eating grass and bugs.

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  131. I've had chickens the last three years, and they were good therapy while I was going through cancer treatments. I enjoy spoiling them, so this book would really help me to make my clucking little buddies very happy chickens.

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  132. Our chickens eat everything. We have a hard time keeping them out of the garden. They love eating our new sprouts.

    nicholas summersell at gmail.com

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  133. My 6 hens love ranging around our 1 acre fenced in yard, and are so fortunate to have a safe place to roam! They are enjoying the opportunity to glean what they can from our veggie garden, and I have a great spot picked out for my "chicken garden." I am needing ideas and inspiration, however, and want to make sure I include the very best plants for the chickens to enjoy!

    magee.liz@gmail.com

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  134. Not very successful. I have one chicken who keeps escaping their enclosure and tears up my garden. I just got this book yesterday from the library...I had to wait three months to get a copy. I would love my own copy!
    Gingeroo616 at AOL dotcom

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  135. I have ducks, not chickens, and they pretty mmuch destroy any flower beds they have access to. I keep them out of my vegetable garden when it is planted, but they love patrolling it when it is freshly tilled and during the winter.

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  136. I have not yet begun landscaping around my chicken pen, but I certainly am looking forward to it!!

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  137. We just got our girls this year and have them in pens/runs. I am scared to death to let them out free ranging in my yard because I haven't done enough research into what they can/can't/shouldn't eat that I have. Oy. Off to google some more!

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  138. I have 2 rosebushes that were given to me over 7 years ago by my daughter-in-law Brandy for my birthday. Those rosebushes always looked bit up and dead, but I wanted to give them a chance because, well, they were given to me by Brandy, and I didn't have the heart to yank them out and throw them away. It wasn't until I had my chickens and let them free range that I finally started to get rose blooms! The chickens kept all the bugs off so the plants could finally thrive! I would definitely call this a success story!
    Shelly
    simplyshelly@comcast.net

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  139. Just moved to an acre property adjacent to my daughter's family of 7 (5 sons!), also living on an acre. Together we are planning a little family homestead and hope to add chickens next year. This book would help in the planning and planting stages. Thanks for the opportunity to win "Free Range Chicken Gardens"!

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  140. I have some creative chicken keeping: we live in the woods and can raised ferns and moss with gusto, plus our henhouse is built into the side of a ravine. Open to any and all suggestions! Thanks for the opportunity!
    Jennifer
    jacdvm@mindspring.com

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  141. Mcarstensen1@att.net
    I have had chickens since May and would love to have a garden that I know is safe for them.

    Maria Carstensen

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  142. I've had a fair amount of success with flower beds. I've been careful not to plant what is toxic to chickens. They actually do a little bit of weeding for me! The most damage, actually, is that they kick the mulch into the grass, which is easy enough to rake back into the beds. I am getting ready to start a vegetable garden and crave some tips for planning wisely with consideration of my flock.

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  143. My plants love the scratching and pecking!! My raised bed came to life when I started letting the girls in there. When the plants are small I put poultry netting over them, but as they mature the girls seem to leave them alone.

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  144. I am an Occupational Therapist and one of my clients gave me a chicken. I have fallen in LOVE with her and I want to absorb EVERYTHING I can to take care of her. She is laying green eggs!! I would love to win this book so that I can know what to plant in my yard that would be beneficial for her health!

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  145. Call me a Future-to-be-chicken-owner. I've just recently took interest on gardening due to my wish to have my own backyard chicken on the future. I've got a few blueberry bushes and a small herb garden started this year and things have been just splendid.

    My email address is lapisciel@gmail.com

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  146. I have 17 chickens of my own and 6 timeshare chickens that come running over every morning from my next door neighbor's along with their turkey Butterball (we call her Lumpy Lurkey Turkey though). My food is better I guess!! I don't mind - however I AM building a big run so my girls can free range longer during the day while being protected from predators. I would love to be able to plant some chicken friendly items for all of them to enjoy within their run, as well as plants that I can enjoy without them destroying. I did find out they adore garlic chives. A lot.

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  147. I would love to win a copy of this book. We have 14 chickens in our back yard free range habitat. They do have a "greens" set up with old pallet and rabbit wire. Which I have kept seeded with clover over summer and will seed with rye grass all winter. But any new ideas on keeping our hens happy all seasons is more than welcome. Here's to hoping I win a copy of this great book.

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  148. Our chickens are all free range (about 20). Thankfully they do not fly into my garden, but they do fly up into my apple trees. I really enjoy my chickens and would love to be able to better provide for them. Thanks for the giveaway. debdever@yahoo.com

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  149. It's been many, many years since I've raised chickens. I am starting anew with a dozen and they are just starting to lay. My 3/4 acre yard (garden) has been very low maintenance (aka: non-existent and/or let it run wild with local plants--manzanita, oak, poison oak, hemlock, etc) until now. I am trying to research which are safe and which to avoid as I try to put back together the run (approx 20'x15') that I dismantled when I gave up the chickens.

    I've got some no-nos in the yard (hydrangea, plum...) but they will not be IN the run. The run is a pile of dirt, junk and weeds (some I think are not good for them) and the plum overhangs into the run, so I have my work cut out to make it safe. Right now, the girls are stuck in a 20'x8' coop/run -- are content, but are starting to show signs of wanting to get out and explore...before it rains, I'd like to have it done...with plants for them to safely nibble on.

    The book would help tremendously!

    Believe it or not, I do love gardening, but it has been at the bottom of my to-do list for the last six years as I healed from various surgeries & recovered from the loss of my husband and started to regain control of my unruly home and yard.

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  150. I don't have chickens yet, but think that this book would help me plan my garden and landscaping for when I do.
    debrahankins@comcast.net

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  151. I live in Alaska and knew people had chickens but figured they had elaborate heated coops for them and it was not cost effective for me until I saw a friend of my daughters coop. Even at -20degrees below zero the chickens only needed one light bulb to stay warm. I came home asked my husband if we could have chicken (figured I would have a fight on my hands as we already have a large variety of pets, 16 in all) I hardly finished my sentence after showing him pics of the coop and he said yes. So now we have 7 hens who will be ready to lay around Halloween, they will be in a heated barn with our mini donkeys.(hubby went a little crazy with the coop plans) Because of our weasel problems and our big dogs we built a chicken tractor for the summer and it worked very well in our garden and in the main yard, have beautiful lush green patches of new grass everywhere, will have to overlap the tractor next summer to fill in the spaces.

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  152. Have been thinking about raising free-range chicken! This book would be a great help! bycura@comporium.net

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  153. My chickens think my flower beds are their personal salad bar. :)
    lsvw1117@yahoo.com

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  154. I have found that the younger chickens do less damage in my garden than the older girls. I have raised beds now, and a fenced in garden that I only let the chickens into when the plants are well established, and even the only limited days and time periods. I love my girls but they can quickly destroy my plants!
    I would love this book, so I can allow the girls in the garden more often! :)

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  155. This was our first year raising chickens. My girls used them for 4h. It has certainly been a learning experience...what breed to buy, what supplies, how to build a coop, etc. We are still learning. We enjoy watching them and the girls love holding them.

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  156. This is our first experience with chickens! We grew a nice lush green grassy area in their run before we brought the chicks home, but it lasted less than a week once they started living outside. They get to enjoy the grass in our yard during free range time. Not sure i will allow them in our garden just yet, but they love the garden scraps! We love our girls! :)
    Brit868@yahoo.com

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  157. We let our flock of ten have free range to our backyard daily from sun up to about an hour before sundown. Once our garden has been established they haven't damaged anything at all. But we only had 4 hens at the time we planted last spring. I am thinking n ext year I may need to leave them in the run until plants are established or fence of the garden. Just the other day our Rhode Island Red rooster followed my husband every step as he was tilling the soil under after the plants had died out. I think the rooster thinks he is really doing something because when we use the push mower he follows us then too. Not to eat bugs though he just likes to follow us. LOL! I would love to have the book just to see if there are specific ways to plant or thinks I should not plant for the safety of my flock. BTW I Love this blog! so informative.
    kimbo_1964k@yahoo.com

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  158. I live your blog. I'm a wanna be chicken chick. Hoping to move to a new place where I can have them. My cousin has her own small flock and I get my chicken time with her! I garden though and would love to integrate the two when I get a new place!

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  159. I would really like to win this book! I have had little success combining my birds with my gardening. I am moving to a rental home with a wonderful backyard and chicken run.

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  160. I had a nice long comment then the phone hiccuped... Basically chickens killed everything in thier run/pen, want to expand and have plants that might survive. Ducks need somethig they can hide in but won't take over the yard like the weed that's their right now!

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  161. I have had success keeping a small flock of backyard chickens, mainly for fresh, organic eggs. This book would increase my knowledge and help me maintain my flock healthy and happy.

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  162. We added our first chickens a year ago and have thuroughly loved every minute of them. Their different personalities are enjoyable and amusing. Weve not had a bit of trouble with predators but have had a heck of a time keeping them IN the coop/run. I have just started to plant things around their area to give them more shade and to beautify the yard. They love to scratch at anything I put down to the point they kill it or dig it up. Im hoping to find something theyll leave alone, lilies, hosta and mums are a no go at this point. Suggestions welcomed!!!!! =) kittyral94@yahoo.com

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  163. Our flock is just over a year old and free-range on our 17 acre farm. We don't have too much trouble with the chickens in the garden, except to snack on a few tomatoes. :)

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  164. No chickens for me yet. Maybe next year, I'm still trying to talk my hubby into getting a couple. We did start a veggie garden this year and it was somewhat successful but we could use some help so next years garden does even better.

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  165. I have not had my girls and boys in a run they have always been Free Range:) Every morning I let them out and each night they go in when the sun is setting just like clock work. I count them each night and each morning and the coop is only to sleep in and sometimes in the winter and early spring they nest. Otherwise we always know where they are nesting and they always make their boundries. We now are living on a horse ranch and they love the hay barn and the manure pile. We moved in the spring bringing them down from Washington State to Northern California and the vet said they are the prettiest birds she has ever seen. We have raised to clutches and they all turn out just wonderful. I wouldn't dream of having them in a run, I love that they just go and come back each night:)

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  166. I've been trying to find things to grow on the outside of my coop for the girls. I need to work on setting up a garden for them. They dig into everything so I'm afraid that if I tried to put in a protected garden in the run, they would just dig under the sides. I think this book could give me some good ideas!

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  167. I don't have any chickens yet and I pretty have pretty much killed everything I have ever planted with the exception of a few rose bushes, a strawberry plant, and tomatoes and peppers. lol But I vow to have my own chickens, and not kill them, and learn how to grow things properly. That's how I found your site...researching!!

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  168. I can't wait to retire to start our own chickens winning this book would be a great help as to what variety and environment living conditions.

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  169. I didn't have very good luck with my garden this year, it was just too hot and dry, or raining almost every day, no happy medium. I brought the jalapeno peppers inside and put them on a cat shelf in the living room window. Hopefully the cats won't eat them before they can bloom! I would love to win a chicken guide, I'll need all the good help i can get! dragonlover257@gmail.com.

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  170. Have been fascinated with chickens for some time and purchased our first 8 chickens this spring. They have been such an enjoyment to our family and I can't imagine life without them! We are starting a new adventure as our little bantam hen has decided she wants to be a Momma and is sitting on not only her egg, but the eggs of 2 other hens. Already have 6 more chicks on order to arrive in October :) Due to neighborhood dogs and hawks, they are kept in our coop and run, but seem happy as can be.

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  171. We just started letting our girls out and where do they go but under the neighbors tree where there is no grass and start digging

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  172. I love my new flock! I truely enjoy learning everything I can about them and their care. I want to learn more about what to plant that would be good and beneficial for them. I want them to have a long happy, healthy life.

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  173. I had some success with planting a butterfly bush inside the run, I did have to fence it for now, but it is still thriving. I failed miserably by planting purple coneflowers in front of the run, during their free range time they would go at them like crazy, so I moved them to my large flower bed where they have left them alone.

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  174. My chicken run is shared with several wild turkeys and has been in place for nearly 15 yrs. at the moment no grass is ever growing in there. I need to till it up completely and start over. I need all the help I can get! Plus I'm huge on letting them eat naturally during the day. Would love this book and all the info it provides! LexyLVT@yahoo.com

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  175. Our chicken pen is definitely a work in progress. It is kind of desert vs. jungle. Which means it is large weed central in the back and barren land in the front where I've pulled weeds. I would love to turn it into a nicer place for the girls to hang out and for me to hang out with the girls.

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  176. I actually just blogged about gardens and chickens this weekend! We're new to chickens, to this area, to year-round gardening and everyday is an adventure!
    You can find my recent post at saradalton-busch.blogspot.com

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  177. I would love to know what to plant and what not to plant to make my chickens HAPPY !! :)
    scaholland@msn.com

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  178. My girls have a 100 x 50 foot fenced backyard to "run" in. They've done a pretty good job of thinning the grass and taking out some established perennials so I'd be interested in finding a happy balance for both the chickens and the plants!

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  179. Last year wast first year with chickens. I have been an avid gardener for 15 years. The chickens trashed my garden, flower beds and took over the desert tortoise pen, as that dirt is best for a dirt bath apparently. I invested 100 dollars in chicken wire to fence everything off only to discover I did not want to garden over a fence. I would love a copy of this book to figure out the harmony that seems to be missing. Howevery best idea was to get a kids plastic swimming pool and full it with dirt and mulch, they love their "play pen"! I also throw their treats in there.

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  180. This is my first year to raise chickens. I absolutely love my chickens. That is the best decision I have made. I sit out with them in the mornings before work and in the afternoon after work for hours. I would love to know what could and couldn't be planted out with them. What will and will not harm them. I have to be very careful because my chickens are pets not just egg machines or plain ol fowl. Lol. I really hope I get to win this book to help me and my chickens have a beautiful and bountiful yard. Thanks

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  181. We started container gardening and put the containers with growing veggies on the roof part of our 1st floor; we've learned our chickens cannot reach there after they smushed our Marigolds, scratched out our lemongrass, and kept pecking at and eating our fresh herbs. Our baby lettuce that I had JUST bought was still sitting on the patio table while I went looking for some pots and soil. When I came back, there were 3 happy chickens on the table surrounded by dirt from the little planters and no trace of greens! Still learning!

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  182. I would love a copy of this book - I'm still working on my coop set up (hopefully chicks in the spring), and am exploring all my design options right now :)

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  183. In our first year on our farmette, we have accumulated over 40 chickens it's amazing how once you get a few you want more). They are able to free range in a pasture, but we have no shade to speak for them. I'm looking at adding some bushes/trees that will give them somewhere to hang out when it's hot, and plants we would grow for them to enjoy fresh veggies/greens. We planted some little willow trees, but those will, needless to say, take a while. Could use some advice! Great giveaway! slaclr@hotmail.com

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  184. Only had my rescued girls since May but already have a new 4 week old chick from an egg I shoved under my "broody Butt". The ladies so far are well behaved and stay in the fence and out of the fenced in herb garden when I let them out to play in the yard but my chick (named Noodle)right thru the fence!!!!
    would love the book for help and ideas and then to donate to our local library! evwoyak@newnorth.net

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  185. I've had chickens for two years now and am just learning about landscaping/gardening around chickens. We let them into the veggie garden once the plants were well established and they truly enjoyed that. We also try to let them out of the run each day to freely roam our big backyard. They LOVE it ! However, sometimes they get into my flower beds and dig in the mulch and make a mess ! They seem to flock to the strawberry patch, but I have to shoo them away if we want to actually grow berries (which they absolutely LOVE !!) I read about planting "chicken friendly" plants in pots and then placing those pots directly in the chicken's run...sounds like a great idea for next spring. I would love to win this book to learn more ways to treat my hard working ladies !!! Thanks. My e-mail address is: Mamabirdy55@aol.com

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  186. WE just moved into a new home this week and the previous owners asked if we would like the 12 chickens that live there also. I jumped at the opportunity. I have always wanted to have backyard chickens but now that I have them I can use all the helpful information I can get my hands on. I just love them.

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  187. I had to give up gardening and planting flowers in favor of having chickens. They somehow manage to destroy everything! But it's clearly worth it :)

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  188. My friends and i went in together and built a coop and started a small flock of free-range chickens.. We're brand new to this as of this summer, so would love to get ahold of this book for some insight and ideas. Right now our chickens are kept at my friend's house, but next year i would love to start a chicken garden of my own... I will need to keep the chickens safe from my dogs, escape into the road, and predators from our 15 acres of woods... and i'll need to learn how to have a garden without the chickens finding it delicious, too.

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  189. My chickens are only 4-weeks old, so I can't comment about the garden success with chickens, yet. But I do own this book and love it! I love it for the beautiful pictures - it sits on my coffee table.

    Judy
    right.judy!gmail.com

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  190. We don't have chickens, but would really like to get some someday. I planted corn for the first time this summer. We live in the Pacific Northwest and people say you can't grow corn here. We have a lot of ears so far (praying they get bigger though). We're having a lot of luck with tomatoes this year, I started them from seed (something else I did for the first time this year). Saving seed and growing them indoors is what I would recommend to get a head start on the summer growing season. honeybell86@gmail.com

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  191. I've been wanting to get a few chickens but wasn't sure what to do with them and still have a garden. This book sounds ideal. jake dot t at excite dot com

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  192. I had the yard professionally landscaped, zoysia sod and lots of natural ornamentals along the back of the house all mulched in with pine straw. The girls loved to scratch the mulch onto the sod. I thought my husband would have a coronary! I took the 2 foot cheep chicken wire and laid it under the pine straw mulch right at the boarder of the sod. That took care of that!
    I would like to plant things the hens CAN eat.
    Would love to win this book!

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  193. I just started raising chickens last year and free range them. I appreciate your pictures and facebook page. Thanks for all you do to help us learn more about chickens!

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  194. My hens are free range. We have just moved our electric fences and our four cows have destroyed the flip up opening to the nesting box on their coop which I have named Cluckingham Palace! My girls names are Gertie, Red Top, Henny Penny, Owl Face and I also have Casper the Rooster. I love this blog and would love to win this book. You can find me at on my facebook page all about my back yard gardening and chickens here:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/511746272187041/

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Thank you for your kind comments and joining along with Fresh Eggs Daily as we live our wonderful, natural country farm life.

Lisa of Fresh Eggs Daily
www.facebook.com/FreshEggsDaily