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Wednesday, March 7, 2012

The Chicken Encyclopedia Blog Tour

Welcome to Fresh Eggs Daily !  
We are proud to be Day 7 of the Blog Book Tour celebrating Gail Damerow’s new book “The Chicken Encyclopedia.”  

(See below for a complete listing of the dates and other blogs participating. You may also visit Storey’s Blog for more information.)


I was never the type to sit around reading the dictionary or going through a set of encyclopedias starting with the letter A and reading all the way through to Z. In fact, I don't actually read much nonfiction at all.  So when Storey Publishing asked me if I would be interested in reviewing Gail Damerow's new book The Chicken Encyclopedia, I figured it would be a great reference book to keep handy, but not really something I would sit down and read cover to cover.  Well....I was wrong.

I started to flip through the oversized paperback book and under the Es, learned that an egg white contains more than 40 proteins. Flipping ahead a few more pages, I learned that roosters with very large combs often suffer infertility issues due to not being able to get their heads into narrow feeders to get enough nutrition. After flipping around a bit more, I learned that chickens rub their beaks on the ground to keep them clean, sharpened and trimmed.  At that point I realized this book needs to be read straight through, starting from the beginning.

This is a wonderful reference book for anyone who raises chickens or is thinking of raising them, organized alphabetically and covering everything from breed characteristics, to common (and not so common) chicken illnesses, chicken behavior, tips on brooding and hatching, types of feathers, just to name a few topics touched upon.  But it is so much more than that. It is also fascinating reading.  To borrow from Jerry McGuire, "Ms. Damerow, you had me from Albumen."

I couldn't put this encyclopedia down. It will have a permanent place on my bookshelf as a reference book, but I am also enjoying reading it.  It includes color illustrations and photographs along with first rate information compiled by a true chicken expert.  It is written so that a brand new chicken keeper can understand it, but I can almost guarantee that even a veteran chicken farmer will learn something new.  I myself have read so many fascinating facts that I never knew.

In addition to the alphabetical listings, at the back is a great appendix of 'Breed Traits at a Glance' which includes breed size, comb type, if they are heat- or cold-tolerant, egg size and color, temperament and place of origin.

I stayed up late last night, eagerly absorbing as much information as I possibly could. I learned that the Faverolle was bred from so many different breeds no one really knows the exact origin, that epsom salts or molasses can be used to flush toxins from chickens' bodies in a case of poisoning, and that the normal heart rate of a resting hen is 312 beats per minute.

And I'm only up to the letter P...

Available for sale from Amazon.com or
The Chicken Encyclopedia on Storey's website: http://www.storey.com/book_detail.php?

As part of the Storey Publishing Blog Tour, I also had the exciting opportunity recently to pick author Gail Damerow's brain. I asked her a few questions and was really excited to get her thoughts on a couple of different areas of chicken keeping:

Fresh Eggs DailyWhat is your favorite breed of chicken ? If you could only raise one breed what would it be ?

Gail Damerow:  Picking a favorite breed is nearly impossible, as every breed has intriguing features. Every few years I review the options to re-evaluate the available breeds to see which one would be ideal for our current needs. These days we have Rhode Island Reds and barred Plymouth Rocks for meat and eggs, and black Silkies as garden pets. If I had to choose one of the three, it would probably be the Rocks. But given unlimited facilities I'd keep many other additional breeds to the three I have now.

 FED: What are your thoughts on using food-grade DE with a backyard flock ? In your book you mention both pros and cons and I personally do sprinkle it in the nesting boxes, coop floor and around the feeders to battle mites and flies and also add it to the feed, but I have read about the possible lung/respiratory damage and that does concern me a bit.

GD: I don't like the idea of using DE in the dust bathing area because it could get inhaled, but your other uses are sensible and safer.

FED: I have read that marigold flowers make egg yolks more vibrant. Is there any other way to improve the vibrancy and color of our egg yolks ?

GD: Let the hens forage, or feed them a little alfalfa. I raise dairy goats as well as chickens, and when we have a surplus of milk I mix fines (bits of alfalfa leaves that filter to the bottom of the hay feeder) with milk, let it set overnight, and feed it in the morning. It provides both green feed for lovely yolks and fermented milk/yogurt for good health, and the hens mob me when they see me coming with the bucket.

FED:  Do you recommend getting hatchery chicks vaccinated for Mareks ? Do you advocate the use of medicated feed for the first few weeks of a chick's life ? Do your recommendations differ if one hatches
the chicks themselves or is raising chickens for the first time ?

GD:  I believe in raising chickens with strong immune systems, so I do not vaccinate or use medicated feeds. However, new chicken keepers (especially young ones) may have trouble coping with the occasional
chicken that doesn't thrive, and for them vaccination against Marek's disease and the use of medicated feeds makes sense. One caveat: If chicks are vaccinated against coccidiosis, medicated feed is not necessary and using it would counteract the vaccine.

It was wonderful to be able to ask such a noted expert her thoughts on raising chickens.  Thank you Gail !


Follow along and visit the other blogs on the Chicken Encyclopedia Blog Tour:




Available for sale from Amazon.com

96 comments:

  1. It's interesting that they recommend not to put DE in their dust bathing spots because they could inhale the dust. I'll have to think about that further.

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    1. Same here. I believe that the DE does control mites and lice...so its a trade off I guess.

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    2. I'm new at this. What is their dust bathing spots?

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  2. I don't have any words of wisdom yet. I am getting my first chicks on 4/20 and I'm excited and scared at the same time. I could REALLY use this book!

    purrfectpetsitting(at)hotmail.com

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    1. Congrats Wendy ! It's a great book...I've entered you into the contest. Good luck !

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  3. I am going to research again the pro's and con's of DE. I use it everywhere, and I am very concerned if it may cause some health issues if inhaled. This book sounds like it has many good things in it for someone who is just starting out...like me:) The most surprising thing I have realized about chickens is how completely absorbed I can become watching them - they are fascinating!!! Thank you FED for the review of this wonderful book.

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    1. I agree Tracey. I do believe the overall benefits outweigh any potential problems, but I am careful not to use it around my vegetable garden since it also kills bees, ladybugs and other 'good'bugs...and I make sure that no one breathes in the dust when I sprinkle it.

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  4. I'm like Wendy. Don't have any chickens yet, but have been reading for a while now.
    I'm surprised to hear about ED and dust bathing. I guess I can understand it, though. I know you can use it everywhere in the coop to keep mites under control.

    I guess the most interesting thing I've read about chickens so far is that a good brooder can be used to hatch just about anything from chickens to guineas.

    Have a wonderful day!

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    1. I had no idea you didn't have chickens yet Linda ! Any on the horizon for you ?

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  5. I have learned that meal works are like crack for chickens! LMBO It is amazing how fast they can make 100 of them disapear!!!

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  6. Great Q&A! I was surprised to learn Gail Damerow's thoughts on her preferences regarding Marek's vaccines, medicated starter feed and DE in dustbathing areas. Definitely food for thought!

    I love this book and wonder how we all got along without it!

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    1. I was surprised also. I didn't get the impression from the book that is was necessarily geared towards a more holistic way of raising chickens, but her views seem to mesh with mine on many of the topics we discussed.

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  7. Lisa, I appreciate your review and found your questions to Gail to be spot on with many concerns that I have as well and found the answers very helpful. If I don't win this book, I will find a way to get it. In the meantime, I am going to Amazon.com and adding it to my wish list.
    What amazes me the most with chickens, is the trans-like state they go into when they lay eggs and brood them. I find animal instinct to be fascinating.

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    1. Oh good Amy ! I am so glad. It really is a great book. Good luck !

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  8. The one thing I have learned from raising chickens, is that they have TERRIFIC personalities!!! They remind me of dogs, they come running when they see you coming, they are always under your feet wanting your attention and they love unconditionally. I had no idea when I got my first chicken that I would "fall in love" with them:)

    I hope I win this book to help me on my journey with chickens. I'm only 6 months in and intend on raising as long as I can care for them.

    Christa
    cmkenyon01@yahoo.com

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  9. I have learned so much raising chickens when it comes to actual breeds and day-to-day care that I really don't know what to choose, but when it's all is said and done, at the end of the day what I've learned by far is how much I have fallen head over heels for the little buggers! Smiling & Waving, Sharon

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  10. When we first started raising chickens I thought they were just for eggs. I am absolutely amazed how devoted I became with these little gals. I actually have trouble sleeping because I am worrying about them. I am obsessed. All my spare time is spent reading about chickens, blogging about chickens, planning a better area for the chickens, predators, pests, and problems. Who knew?

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    1. So true Sara. Same here. I actually have nightmares at times where all sort of awful things befall them...they do wiggle their way into nearly every waking (and sleeping) thought.

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  11. We've had our chickens for a week now. I'm amazed at how quickly they learn, how they learn from each other, and how much they slow me down. I can sit over the brooder and watch them forever.

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    1. How wonderful Lisa ! It only gets better believe me ! And yes, its so easy to while away the hours just watching them.

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  12. I love your book reviews, Lisa. This one sounds like a great resource! I love encyclopedias because the information is condensed and easy to find.

    The thing that surprised me MOST was how many wonderful people peeps I would meet as a result of raising chickens. -Becky Neville

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  13. I would have to say that the most surprising thing I have learned about chickens since I first got them one year ago is that they each have their own distinct personality. I never knew I would love chickens and love watching them but I do. Absolutely adore them.

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  14. I don't have chickens, but my daughter and son-in-law just bought 36 acres and are planning on raising some. This information sounds like just what they'll need as new chicken parents. It would make a wonderful gift.

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  15. I think the most surprising thing I have learned from raising my chickens is how easy it is to fall in love with them. They are not "just" chickens... they are so individual and each has their own personality!

    Kim@frankandkim.com

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  16. I really appreciate Gail's comments about vaccinations. I learned that it is not always best to vaccinate.

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  17. I was surprised to learn that it is okay not to vaccinate for Marek's. I had no idea I was supposed to vaccinate for that that on Day 1 of hatch, and when I found out, it was too late, so I worried. But my little chick is now 23 weeks old and seems healthy and happy. I was upset initially to learn that she is a breed that is very susceptible to Marek's (SLS Bantam), but so far she seems to be doing well. I sure hope she never gets Marek's!

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    1. Should I win the Chicken Encyclopedia (hope, hope!), my e-mail address, which I forgot to put in my comment above is:
      GraciaLynne@MSN.com

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    2. I have always bought vaccinated chicks also...but am hatching my own, which won't be vaccinated. Fingers crossed.

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  18. YEs I would do cartwheels to win this!!! In grave need of this book. First time chicken rancher... I have 37 sweet babies right now. Out of that one full grown roo and 7 layers. 1 that was to be a meat chicken for us but don't have the heart to kill and eat her so she has been pardoned. We have 18 2 month olds and 10 2 week olds and 2 two week old ducks.... Loveing them all...
    Gina Cromer
    Cromer's farm & coop...
    Chicken mama

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  19. I am so excited about this book. It will be a great resource for the 4H kids and me! Even though I have been keeping chickens for years. it amazes me how much I continue to learn! Bubmlefoot was my big one this year!

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  20. Been following for a while. Hmmm...most suprising thing? I think originally when I started it was the dust bathing...that heart stopping moment when you think they're writhing in pain LOL. But otherwise it's how intelligent they are. It's really amazing how people are realizing they're very intelligent and you can actually train them. :)

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  21. Something I was surprised over about chickens is their personalities. Before I had them, I just thought of them as thoughtless birds. I didn't even want them, it was my husband's idea. But once they arrived it was love at first sight. Now I can't imagine my life without them. It's so funny how they each have their own personalities & just how smart they are. I love just going over to the coop & hanging out with the girls.
    badmunki68@yahoo.com

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  22. I was surprised that my 5 girls could gain as big a place in my heart as my dog or cat. Raising and caring for them is every bit as fun as a household pet, and even more rewarding! (In the form of delicious eggs!)
    But what probably surprised me most is the volume of poop 5 hens can produce! I purchased a special, extra-large compost bin when the girls were chicks, hoping that it would be sufficient to compost their waste/litter on a continuous basis...It was full in a matter of a few months and I'm contemplating the purchase of another! They are pooping machines! And... I hesitate to admit...I'm so obsessed with them that...I actually know whose poop is whose! My tiny bantam's droppings always make me smile in the morning--mini poops from a mini-chickie. I need some serious help!!

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  23. hi Lisa- thanks for participating in the blog tour. It is fun and educational. I was born and raised in NYC - my family is convinced I am a changeling- as i am happily living on Cape Cod and can relate to your story!
    It is coming up to our 1yr anniversary with our girls. The biggest surprise (and there are many) was to discover and experience the depth and levels of their communication skills and comprehension. They chat, ask, scold, laugh, etc...truly an amazing relationship to be privileged to experience. Cannot imagine life without chickens! thanks - Laura

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    1. oh- new to this blogging format and didn't see where to leave my info - so here is my email in case i am lucky enough to win: surfingthesandbar@yahoo.com . thanks again
      Laura

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  24. I was amazed at how excited my chickens get over their treats! They literally run to me in the yard when they see me coming with goodies! I also cannot believe how ADDICTIVE raising chickens is! There's always another breed I'm wanting to add!

    lroach711@att.net

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  25. I love how the chickens have their own little habits. I have one white Araucauna and she is always the last one into the coop at night- she can't stop exploring! Thanks for the giveaway opp!

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  26. I heard that the acidophiles in yogurt was a way to keep your chickens free of worms. If it is true, there would be no with holding time for meat or eggs.
    jbnkfox@frontier.com

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    1. I give ours Probiotic powder which is basically powdered yogurt. It has lots of health benefits and keeps the good bacteria in their intestine. For worms, I use ground pumpkin seed a few times a year, Food-grade DE and garlic. Might work, can't hurt and there's not holding time.

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  27. I am surprised at how smart my girls are! I would love to win this book. Lisie Pfeiffer lis4692@gmail.com

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  28. I would love to win the book!It was interesting to me when I learned my partridge wyandotte rooster needed his vent feathers clipped to breed the hens.I hadn't been able to hatch any chicks until I did this and also cut his spurs.It was most surprising that my husband who wouldn't collect the eggs now is bringing them in every time he goes out!Judy at slowj@copper.net

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  29. I've just learned that you should always love your flock. I've had a nasty rooster, and have hated going to to my chicken coop for months now. When I finally got around to getting rid of the rooster, I started falling in love with my flock agian. I'm trying to hatch a new rooster, and can't wait to have that "pet chicken" that everyone else has. I would love a copy of this book, Thanks for being a part of this giveaway! eposegate@hotmail.com

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  30. I have found everything you have wrote about to be new and informative. I have just bought my coop and pen and will be putting it together this next 2 weeks
    I am following yur blog and liked you on Fb......
    I look forward to learning all i can about the chciekns i will be buying soon. I am very excited !

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  31. I had planned to use the DE to keep the mites down so i find it informative on how to use it
    lisabrawner59@gmail.com

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  32. THat it is okay not to vaccinate. My children are vax free...so why not my chickens!?

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  33. I would love to have the chicken encyclopedia on my bookshelf!

    In response to your question of what has surprised me most about raising chickens...I think it must be the fact that they "put themselves to bed" every evening when the sun goes down. What a wonderful trait!

    I also have ducks and they would stay out till the wee hours of the night just like teenagers if left to their own devices!

    shelley.dahme@gmail.com

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  34. I was surprised to learn that a rooster can get very ill from eating layer food for hens. Apparently it has way too much calcium in it for roosters and can cause them to have kidney failure.

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    1. I forgot to leave my e-mail address in case I should win. It is: DocVBK@msn.com Thanks!

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  35. The most surprising thing I have learned since starting raising chickens 2 years ago is how much I would enjoy it, and my whole family as well. I also learned that happy surprised feeling when you open the nesting boxes and there are eggs there, is still just as fun, two years later. We really enjoy our flock and a reference book like this would be a great addition to our homesteading bookshelf. Thanks for hosting such a great giveaway and congrats on being on the blog tour!

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    1. Thank you Katie ! It's such a great book and I agree with everything you point out.

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  36. Barbara AndersonMarch 8, 2012 at 9:19 PM

    An *excellent* review, Lisa! I really don't need more books, but now I want this one! I like that it has details like you reference above (40 proteins, etc). I am a *detail* person! A couple of things that I was surprised about when I first got chickens was 1) that the white stuff in the dropping is the pee (urea) and 2) the journey the egg takes, getting layers put on as it travels to point of lay. =D

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  37. I'm a happy follower! Love your chicken info! Surprised since having chickens? That we REALLY enjoy having them! I always figured they were JUST chickens, but they have personalities and are FUN to watch!

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  38. This sounds like it will be a great book. I will be looking to add this to my collection of farming books. I was most surprised to hear that marigolds could make the eggs more vibrant. I knew that free ranging helped with that and I find that my yolks are very dark and we free range our chickens.

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  39. I would love to win the book. I have chickens since december son I'm new at this. But I learned that they are small but eat like dragons. The treats I give them everyday are the highlight of their day. My highlight is to see them happy doing whats natural for them. Free ranging and chasing bugs.

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  40. We are chicken newbies waiting anxiously for our chicks to come in the mail! We have their brooder all set and ready to "fire" up. Everyone I talk to about raising chickens love it. I'm getting so excited to start this new adventure with our family! I'd love to have this resource on my shelf! Thanks for the opportunity!

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  41. Wow! This book sounds so eggciting!! :-) There are so many things I have learned about chickens and I have two things that suprised me the most: 1)How much personality they really do have...who would have thought it, and 2) How much time I would spend just watching them! I don't get much done these days other than chicken stuff! Love your review...thanks for such a great review and all the knowledge you share with us!

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  42. I now follow.Please enter me in this giveaway.
    patrice@everydayruralty.com

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  43. My rabbits don't eat the alfalfa leaves so they usually get put into the compost. Now I'm excited to know I can feed them to the hens. I'm a follower on facebook and blog.

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  44. Well, I was one of those kids who read the encyclopedia (hey, there was some interesting stuff in there!) so the name of the book is one to catch my eye. After reading this review, it looks like something I'll be adding to my bookshelf.

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  45. It's amazing how much a person can love these little birds! Realizing how very beneficial they are in SO many ways is the best reason for raising and loving chickens!

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    1. Ack! Forgot to leave my email address just in case I win! It's sarahfairy30@yahoo.com

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  46. I'm adding you to my google reader - hopefully that counts for 'following' because that's how I follow all the blogs I read!

    I actually am in the 'book reading' phase of learning about keeping chickens because I can't get any until next spring. What has surprised me most so far is how much ventilation their coops seem to need, even in winter, and I'm a little afraid of not getting that right when I build the coop this summer!

    thanks for the chance to win!
    steeplechaser29 (at) yahoo (dot) com

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    1. Thanks Kate ! Yes, I ended up cutting more vents in my coop. As long as you cover them with 1/2" hardware cloth, your coop will still be predator-proof. I have read that 1/5 of the total wall area should be vents that you can open and close as needed. Glad you're spending so much time to research.

      I sell coop plans - link on the left hand side - for a neat little 4x6 coop that is big enough for up to a dozen hens. Tons of ventilation too !

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  47. I enjoy following you on facebook but I went ahead and joined here too. I just LOVE my chickens. I got my very first chicken years ago when I went to my local animal control to pick up a ferret (I was then running a ferret rescue in FL). They had a white hen in a cage outside and didn't know what to do with it. I had always wanted chickens so I volunteered to take it home. Thus began my love affair. 'Fedelia' slept in a dog carrier on my screened porch at night and every morning would take a tour of my kitchen to eat any crumbs I had left on the floor, then she'd hop up on my lap to watch me feed my infant daughter. When she was satisfied all was well and that she wasn't getting any more handouts, she would let herself out and spend the day foraging in the stand of trees on our property. She never failed to come screaming across the yard when I called her name and left us a white egg in her nest every morning. She taught me how intelligent chickens are and how interested they are in us as well. She also taught me to be a vegetarian. haha. I have lived happily without eating chicken ever since. I now live in OR and have 23 chickens and 8 eggs in my Brinsea Mini incubator. They bring such joy to my day and nearly all of them come screaming across the yard when I go outside. I think they like me too. :)

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  48. I would love to win a copy of this book! It looks very interesting =) I guess the one thing that has surprised me the most as I've been learning about raising chickens, is also probably the one thing I am the most happy about! It is that there are so many people who LOVE their chickens! They treat them like family pets, and that is so refreshing to me. It makes me glad because I already love my one week old chicks and hope to have them around as a joy in my life. God bless =)

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    1. whoops forgot my email, kristieleeguns@centurylink.net

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    2. Congratulations Kristie ! You have been chosen as the winner ! Please email me your mailing address to: Fresheggsdaily@gmail.com. Thanks !

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  49. Sounds like a very good book and I would love to have one. I loaned my "Chickens for Dummies" book to someone and never got it back.Thank you.

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  50. Forgot my email. jaditesam@aol.com

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  51. No chickens yet, but your blog and Fb page has me thinking. I have to do a lot more research. This would be a great first book. I too have done some research regarding DE. Many grades of DE, but need to use food grade for animals and humans. I wanted to use as a dog wormer and add to the food. I am concerned that while eating they will inhale the dust. This was an email I received from a company that supplies food grade DE....

    (DE used in pool ( any water) filtration contains DE that has been chemically treated and heated making the silica crystalline which is a dangerous respiratory hazard and lethal if ingested which can cause silicosis. The fresh water naturally occuring DE deposits that are designated FOOD Grade by the FDA have less than 3% crystalline silica and all other sediment that are considered unsafe are also below harmful limits. These deposits are primarily Amorphous Silica which is harmless when ingested and is commonly used in feed and food industries.)

    Supposedly you can add to water and it works the same way for intestinal worms.
    monalucydesign@cox.net

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    1. I use food-grade DE in my nesting boxes as mite control, mixed into their feed as a wormer and around the feeders to control flies. I have read concerns about them (and me)breathing the dust but I believe the benefits outweigh any potential problems.

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  52. I had never planned on raising chickens. My daughter and her friend came home with 5 chickens one day. They built the pen, bought the supplies and they were supposed to take care of them. I fell in love with them! About 25 chickens later and 15 eggs in the incubator...I"M HOOKED! Can't imagine not having chickens, they are so relaxing and peaceful to watch.
    odayz98@aol.com

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  53. Thank you ALL for your comments. I have enjoyed reading them all. One winner will be chosen at random on Monday, March 19th.

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  54. I couldn't agree more with the vaccination, however, with many of our hens being 4h projects, we have to show proof of vaccination. I'm glad I read this too, esp about the DE. I plan to incorporate it into the pen in the spring. I hadn't thought about the dust.

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  55. I am new to all this but very excited to get started.My niece has started her little flock of chickens and I cannot believe how friendly they are.This book would be of great information. I hope I win. Cyphers77777@aol.com

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  56. I have only had chickens for a few months (with donated layers from a friend thinning hers) but avidly follow you on FB and your blog, and find it a wealth of information. The one thing that has surprised me the most has been when they lay eggs. Each of my girls have different styles, from quiet to loud and I have one that even GRUNTS and another that sounds like she is GROWLING! It is hard work, producing eggs and some let you know just how hard :) I am always scouring the internet for this or that regarding the care, feeding and overall well-being of my girls and would surely put the book to good use if I were to win it. I am currently researching breeds so that I might find some eggs and hatch my own. I have even borrowed an incubator :) Blessings to you and thank you for all the help and information that you provide, it is a Godsend for newbies like me :)
    Mandi Miller
    sevenruns@dishmail.net

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  57. I'm going to buy this book. I think that you can never have too much information!

    The thing that surprised me about chickens is how attached we have become to them. In the past, I have always just bought pullets, but 3 weeks ago I got 28 babies. What a joy to watch them grow, over night!!

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  58. I would love to have a copy of this book! My husband & I built a chicken tractor and on Feb 29th we bought 10 chicks. (3 black sex-links, 3 Rhode Island Reds & 4 Buff Orphingtons) This is our first time having chickens and I already love it! It amazes me how fast they grow! I can't wait til they get bigger and the weather is warmer so we can put the chicken tractor out in the yard. =)

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  59. I'm a new follower, love your blog.
    I raise and show bantam bearded Silkies. I've been so surprised to find out how nice chickens really are. Maybe, I've just been lucky?! But I've heard horror stories of roosters attacking kids, and adult. I've never had this problem with any of mine.

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  60. Chickens are very cheap therapy--and they give eggs too. :)

    Already have your blog on my reader and have been reading your archive!

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  61. I have so much to learn about chickens. Marigolds for brighter yolks? or milk and alfalfa? interesting.

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  62. Please enter me in the giveaway. We are getting our first chicks next week, have beed designing and building the coop and my 12 year old has been spending hours and hours researching the different types of chickens. We can't wait to be chicken-parents!

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  63. I am new to chickens and I am getting 10 from MPC in may. I love your facebook page and I could really use this book! ancarp24 at yahoo dot com

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  64. Something that has surprised me since I started raising chickens? Thats kind of hard, I've had chickens off and on my whole life, but I will have to say I am always amazed at how varied these guys are personality wise. I love how I can have 50 chickens and everyone has a name and a personality of their own. No two are alike, some are extremely friendly and jump up on my arm or shoulder, others are demanding and nab my pant leg. Some love to be held, others hate it. Some of my hens who go broody are sweet about me peeking under them for eggs and babies, while others would rather attempt to tear my finger off and scream like a human anytime I look at them. lol I never thought it would be so hard to decide who stays and who has to go when I have too many for a pen, and my breeder birds who doesn't make the cut standard wise but are so hard to let go because of how attached I am to their personality. scardofshadows at aim dot com

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  65. Very good review,sounds like this would be a very good book to have. There is always more to learn.I have only had chickens since last May.Can't believe I waited so long.They have changed my life,for the better of course.I subscribe to your blog through my email,and really enjoy it. dianna.ellis@gmail.com

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  66. Take 2..... I have enjoyed your post on this book.. found the info on withdrawing the rooster and how many days the girls eggs would still be his very helpful as it is time to hatch new babys and I want pure breeds so each breed is in own run. I have a book all women were given over a hundreed years ago that gives a lot of info on everything a young bride would need to know. It had a cure for sick chickens that I have used. It was to make corn meal mush and add cyane pepper till the mush was very red, my girls had a respiratory infection the vet said put them all down, to my horror. I used this remedy all my girls recovered and lived and produced many eggs. Also said to put apple cider vinegar in the drinking water. Love my girls and my roosters.

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  67. ok again take two is Lynn Crone lynncrone@msn.com

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Lisa of Fresh Eggs Daily
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